Noodle Kugel

A little bit over a week ago, not even realizing that we were coming up on Passover (since I’m not Jewish, religious holidays are barely on my radar except when other food bloggers talk about them), I had a hankering for traditionally Jewish food.

I can count the delis in town that make anything remotely traditionally Jewish on one hand, and most of them are in Bexley. Not wanting to pay an arm and a leg to get my favorites at Katzinger’s, I decided to try my hand at making stuff at home. Over the next few entries, I’m going to chronicle my attempts. Bear in mind, although these recipes are inspired by Jewish dishes, they definitely aren’t kosher. I’m sure that some Orthodox types may have kittens a bit later when they see milk and meat (and cloven hooved meat at that) on the same plate when it comes to the main course. Just bear in mind that I’m a Gentile who digs the flavor of Jewish food without following any of the dietary laws. With that in mind, here’s the first course, which I’m submitting as my entry to this week’s Presto Pasta Night event. It’s a bit different from my usual, since it’s not savory, but was quite delicious, especially with the addition of some dried cherries from Trader Joe’s. This recipe is absolutely foolproof, as evidenced by the delicous results.

kugel

Noodle Kugel
recipe adapted from Recipezaar

8 oz. wide egg noodles
1 c. dried cherries
5 large eggs
1 c. sour cream
1 stick melted butter, cooled
1/3 c. sugar
4 c. whole milk
3 c. corn flakes, coarsely crushed
1/4 c. packed dark brown sugar

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 13x9x2″ glass baking dish. Place uncooked noodles in pan and spread evenly over bottom. Sprinkle with the cherries. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, sour cream, sugar and butter. Add the milk, whisking until smooth.

Pour the mixture evenly over the noodles and let stand for 5 minutes. Combine the cornflake crumbs and brown sugar. Sprinkle evenly over the noodles. Bake about 1 hour or until set in the center. Cut into squares and serve either warm or room temperature.

4 thoughts on “Noodle Kugel

  1. If you like Jewish foods, one of the best cookbook authors out there is Joan Nathan. Her “Jewish Cooking in America” has great recipes, along with ethnic/cultural insights and anecdotes.

    Enjoy.

    Liz

    [p.s. Becky: is there a way I can email you directly? I have some info you may be interested in.]

  2. If you like Jewish foods, one of the best cookbook authors out there is Joan Nathan. Her “Jewish Cooking in America” has great recipes, along with ethnic/cultural insights and anecdotes.

    Enjoy.

    Liz

    [p.s. Becky: is there a way I can email you directly? I have some info you may be interested in.]

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