Apples & Thyme: Sauerbraten

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The Apples & Thyme food blogging event asks us to celebrate the influence of our mothers and grandmothers in the kitchen. Needless to say, my German Oma (great-grandmother) has had the most influence on my cooking – I spent the formative years of my life standing on a stool next to her and learning everything she did in the kitchen hands on. I cannot remember a time in my life where I didn’t help her in the kitchen in one form or another – when I was a toddler, it may have been as simple as snapping off the ends of the green beans for her. Later on, it was making the dough for kuchen or mixing up the meat for frikadelle.

Oma and Opa

One of the dishes that has always remained mysterious to me, though, is sauerbraten. She didn’t make it too often – I think because it was a multi-day, somewhat time consuming recipe. So, unfortunately, I don’t have her recipe. But through trial and error, I’ve found one that comes close. I followed a suggested modification to make it in a crock pot, and it came out beautifully. It was delicious served on a bed of home made spaetzle.

Sauerbraten

Sauerbraten
recipe adapted from AllRecipes.com

2 c. cider vinegar
2 c. water
1/3 c. brown sugar
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/2 tsp. ground allspice
1 tbsp. salt
1/2 tsp. ground black pepper
6 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 onions, diced
4 1/2 lbs. rump roast
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
3/4 c. crushed gingersnaps
1/4 c. brown sugar
1 c. sour cream

In large saucepan over medium heat, combine cider vinegar, water, brown sugar, cloves, allspice, salt, pepper, peppercorns, bay leaf, and onion. Heat, stirring occasionally, until bubbles appear at edges, but do not boil.

Poke deep holes in roast and place in non-metal bowl. Pour vinegar mixture over roast. Cover and refrigerate for four days, turning once daily.

On morning of fifth day put the meat and marinade into the crockpot, and cook it on low for 8 hours or until meat is fall-apart tender. Remove the meat from the pot, and whisk the brown sugar, crushed gingersnaps and sour cream into the liquid. Put the meat back in and serve, preferably with spaetzle.

2 thoughts on “Apples & Thyme: Sauerbraten

  1. This is a lovely post. It is so important to remember where our cooking talents came from as well as where they are going. It is a cycle that goes from our parents and grandparents, to us, and hopefully on to our children. Thank you for sharing this lovely recipe with us. Your Oma looks like a smiley, happy woman, and the sauerbraten looks delicious.

  2. Pingback: Columbus Foodie » Blog Archive » Quick Sauerbraten and Spaetzle

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