Kristina's Loaded Potato Soup

By the time January rolls around, I’m usually in the worst part of the year for my seasonal affective disorder – even more so because my sleep schedule is so off-kilter from holiday preparations that I end up sleeping through most of few hours of sunlight we have. Things don’t usually start turning around for me until late March or April. Despite that, there is one thing I enjoy about winter – the fact that I can break out with hearty soups and stews, without feeling weighed down while eating them. So, on average, you’ll see us whipping up at least a couple of dishes like this for every week of winter. Coupled with a nice sandwich, or side salad, or a bit of crusty bread, it means that dinner gets on the table with a minimum of fuss.

Potato Soup

Kristina’s Loaded Potato Soup
recipe from The Life and Loves of Grumpy’s Honeybunch food blog

4 slices bacon, cooked til crisp reserving 1 Tbsp fat
1 small onion, diced
2 large garlic cloves (adjust to your taste-I love garlic!), minced
6 large potatoes, peeled and diced
4 cups chicken broth
1 teaspoon basil
salt & pepper to taste
green onion, sliced thinly
shredded cheese
2 cups half and half
1 teaspoon hot sauce
3 Tablespoons flour

In large saucepan saute onion and garlic in reserved bacon fat. Add potatoes, chicken broth and basil to pan and simmer until potatoes are tender. Using potato masher, slightly mash potatoes.

Mix flour with half and half and hot sauce, then stir into potato mixture. Cook until slightly thickened. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Serve soup topped with crumbled bacon pieces, shredded cheese and green onion.

Deviated septum surgery has a high success rate in our site deviated septum surgery

The News Sun – Waukegan (IL) April 16, 2012 Dear Doctor K: My husband has a deviated septum. The condition runs in his family, and both his mother and uncle had unsuccessful surgeries to correct theirs. As a result, he refuses to consider surgery. What can be done?

Dear Reader: In people with a deviated septum, one nasal passage inside the nose is wider than normal and one is narrower. This alters the pattern of airflow in the nose and sometimes blocks airflow on the narrowed side.

The nasal septum is the wall between the left and right sides of the nose. It is firm but bendable. Ideally, the nasal septum should lie exactly in the center, forming two equal nasal passages. Yet in about 80 percent of us, the nasal septum is a little off-center. A deviated septum can be a very uncomfortable condition.

Symptoms of a deviated septum can include:

Blockage of one or both nostrils;

Nasal congestion, sometimes on one side; this web site deviated septum surgery

Frequent nosebleeds;

Frequent sinus infections;

Facial pain, headaches, postnasal drip;

Noisy breathing during sleep in infants and young children;

Sleep interrupted by difficulty breathing, including an inability to sleep on one side.

The first step for your husband would be to speak with an otolaryngologist (ear, nose and throat specialist) or plastic surgeon about treatment options.

Steroid nasal sprays may reduce nasal allergies. Such allergies can cause tissues in the nose to swell, which further narrows the nasal passage on the side of the deviated septum. Some people use over-the-counter nasal sprays, such as oxymetazoline. These can open up nasal passages for a few days, but if these sprays are used more than that, they can cause the nasal passages to close down again.

Sometimes surgery ?ˆ” called a septoplasty ?ˆ” is needed. In this procedure, the surgeon moves the septum to a normal position. In some cases, the surgeon also will reshape the external appearance of the nose in a procedure called rhinoplasty. When the two procedures are done at the same time, the surgery is called a septorhinoplasty.

Success rates for septoplasty are actually quite high, from the research I?ˆ™ve read — greater than 80 percent. Look for an ear, nose and throat surgeon who has done a large number of septoplasty operations in his or her career, and in the past couple of years, in particular.

Write to Dr. Komaroff at www.AskDoctorK.com

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