Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Admin, Columbus, Life

For Christmas 2010, right before I got really sick, I bought myself something I had been wanting for years, but had always just stopped short of buying – a really nice DSLR camera so I could step up my game as far as food photography. People always asked me what kind of camera I use for my photos, and seemed somewhat surprised when I told them it was a fairly inexpensive point and shoot. So, Nikon D5000 in hand, I took an introductory class at Cord Camera, and part of the class was a trip to the Franklin Park Conservatory here in town so we could take pictures there. Here’s the best of what I walked away with that day:

Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to use the camera right away (or much at all last summer) because I still lacked the strength to lift the camera and hold it steady enough to get good pictures. But I’m making a commitment to trying to get a good mastery of the camera by the end of the year – between planning to take lessons with a very talented photographer friend of mine, reading camera-specific books outlining all of the features, and lots and lots of practice shots, I’ll get the hang of it, I’m sure. In the meantime, you’ll see a mix of both types (DSLR and point and shoot) of pictures on the blog, with the eventual goal of going to all DSLR in the near future.

What resources did you find invaluable when trying to learn photography? Luckily it’s one of those fields that allows you to *always* learn something new, and I’m curious to find out what worked for others in improving their own work…

One Response to “Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011”

  1. L Welch Says:

    This sounds funny, but my best resource is the camera manual. To catch things like depth of field and picture layout with your camera you need to know how to make your camera do it. I tend to leave mine in semi-automatic. I know which modes will do what to help my composition.

    For your stability issues I would look for a camera with multiple high end stabilization systems on it. They help so much! Especially with zoom. Zooming large distances makes shake more noticeable so you may find that macro work would be a great direction for you, especially as it is easier to brace yourself. A single pole tripod may be useful as well.

    There are also some mid range almost DSLR type cameras out there. The micro 3/4 lens type camera are a great example. A lot smaller and lighter but you can still use different lenses.

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