Event: Taste the Future 2011 and Ticket Giveaway for 2012!

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Charity, Columbus, Events

Taste the Future has always been one of my favorite food events in Columbus, and it’s one I’ve attended every year since I first discovered it (in 2006 or so). We’re quickly coming up on that time again (this time around, a few weeks earlier than it’s traditionally been held because of Columbus State’s switch to the semester system). So be sure to mark your calendars for Tuesday, August 21st, as this is one event you don’t want to miss.

I did manage to be able to go last year, thanks to CSCC’s generosity. It was an off year for me (I wasn’t fully mobile yet, and pushing myself around in a walker plum tuckered me out in no time flat). And last year, because of threat of rain, it was held in the parking garage, so the lighting was a bit off for getting great pictures. Still, I heartily enjoyed the experience, and here are a few images from the event:

Pepper and Cheese Skewers from Sidecar Global Catering

Heirloom BLT Bites- Mini Quiche with Heirloom Tomatoes, Applewood Bacon, & Aged Cheddar, Micro Greens from Lindey's

Shrimp, Chicken, & Andouille Étouffée over Mushroom Rice from Creole Kitchen

Tuna in a Can from Cameron Mitchell Catering

Sushi from AVI Fresh

Mini Chocolate Cupcakes from 3 Babes and a Baker

There’s tons of additional pictures, and you can see the rest of the slideshow here:

Once again, Columbus State has been generous enough to provide me with extra tickets which I’m giving away here on the blog. I’m using a different method of letting you enter and choosing the winner this year, which will provide you with tons of extra opportunities for entries, and can track all the entries and choose the winner much more easily. The only one that is a mandatory entry is the question, the rest are optional, but will allow you up to 30 entries rather than just 5. The giveaway ends on 8/17/2012, and winners must confirm attendance by Monday morning (8/20/2012) or another winner will be drawn. Three pairs of tickets will be given away in total. Please don’t enter if you are aren’t planning on being in the Columbus area on August 21st, and all winners must be of legal drinking age. The only method of entering is through the Rafflecopter plugin, so comments on this blog entry won’t count. If you’re having problems entering, please comment to let me know.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck, everyone – and even if you don’t win tickets, I hope to see you at the event! It provides scholarships to Columbus State Culinary students, and is tax deductible. You can get more information about the event (and the dishes the participating restaurants plan on serving) on the CSCC Taste the Future web site.

Update: You can now earn 5 additional entries by following me on Pinterest – simple to do using the widget above. :)

May is for Foodies!

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Charity, Columbus, Events, North Market

May is always, always one of my favorite months of the year – if not for the great weather (the cold snaps of early spring are behind us, and the weather is still cool enough to enjoy spending time outdoors), then definitely for the events for food lovers that are held this month. Today I’m going to talk about a couple of my favorites – the Taste of Dine Originals and the North Market Apron Gala.

Last May, I was definitely in a whole different place than I’m in this year – I started out the month with a slim to none prognosis of survival, with the best case scenario was that even if I managed to make it through my acute respiratory distress alive, I’d be tethered to a ventilator for my remaining time on earth, which would probably be no longer than a year because human lungs aren’t designed to handle that kind of stress before other organ systems start to fail one by one. When I woke up the second week of May, I was still a bit delusional about my condition – here I was unable to even sit up in bed without falling over, but still thought somehow that I’d be recovered enough in the next week or two to handle all of my usual May events. What the heck was I thinking? But miracles do happen, for sure, and I’m fortunate enough to not only be fully recovered, but to be able to attend both events that are near and dear to me for a multitude of reasons. And you can see why this year is extra special to me.

Lamb Sirloin with Sweet Pea and Minted Pesto from Basi Italia

Tonight’s event, the Taste of Dine Originals, lets the 50 member restaurants of Dine Originals Columbus put their best food forward, offering delicious examples of what makes them restaurants that I’m happy to patronize. Each one is different, and the variety of restaurants that belong (all independents, natch) are a direct reflection of the awesome mix of people we have in our fine capital city. There are fine dining options to go along with the casual spots, ethnic or as American as apple pie, spots at all price points, spots that are open all day, spots that are only open for a few hours a night. In addition to trying dishes from some of my favorite local chefs, there are also other reasons to go – a new venue, local wines and microbrews, and new this year, Edible Columbus is hosting a Food & Artisan Fair at the event, which offers local farmers and artisan food producers to offer samples and information about their methods, farms and products.

Parfait of Walnut Cake with Buttercream Espresso from Alana's Food and Wine

The food is always fabulous at the event – you can see my coverage of previous years here: 2010, 2009.

According to the event planners, “Our signature annual event, Taste of Dine Originals, is one of Ohio’s best food and wine events, featuring tastings and samplings from 50 regional restaurants, 30 vineyards, 2 craft breweries, and a couple of micro distilleries. Whether you’re a seasoned foodie or an intrigued beginner, chefs, brew masters, and winery representatives welcome you as they mix useful knowledge with tastings of signature dishes and interesting beverages. The silent auction features cooking lessons, private dinners, special events, works of art and rare bottles of wine. This year’s event will be held at Capital University’s Capital Center, at 2360 East Mound Street, Columbus, OH 43209. The event will be open from 6-9:30pm. Tickets are $100, proceeds from this event are shared by Dine Originals Columbus and The Buckeye Ranch, which offers mental health treatment and alcohol and drug services for children. Dine Originals Columbus celebrates, supports and promotes the culinary diversity that locally owned and operated member restaurants contribute to the identity and culture of our city. We are committed to strengthening the local economy and enriching our community through education and charitable partnerships. The Buckeye Ranch and Dine Originals both support this community and strive, each in their own manner, to make Central Ohio a better place for everyone.

Later this month is the other event that is one of my annual favorites, the North Market Apron Gala – we’ve personally been attending since 2006 (Paul attended last year, although I couldn’t make it). In many ways the event is the same from year to year, but with each passing year the landscape of the North Market has changed – it is a living, breathing entity unto itself which has its own ebbs and flows – as old favorites disappear, new favorites appear in their place. No matter what, each year is worth attending – not only does it help support a vibrant public market, but it’s also one of those events that you can’t go five feet without seeing someone you know. Catching up with everyone while noshing on delicious food? Count me in!

Pastry from Mozart's

This year, the event is being held on Saturday, May 19th from 7-10pm. Tickets are $75 per person and are available online or through the North Market Business Office (2nd floor of the market at 59 Spruce St, Columbus). Call 614-463-9664 for more information.

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 5/5/2012

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

Here it is the second full week of the 2012 growing season, and this week it was especially crowded because both the Market to Market Ride and the Half Marathon were being held at the same time. Because of that, finding parking was a little more difficult, and the North Market especially was very crowded. Good news for the farmers that sell there, not so good news for us. We finally did manage to find parking (in part because that part of Spruce St. was closed to thru traffic). And this week we had three very special little ones with us – my nephew Brandon and my nieces Autumn and Amber. They had never been to a farmers market and when I tried to explain it to them, they didn’t quite understand it (because they’re used to only seeing fruits and vegetables in the grocery store), so I asked them if they’d like to come along. There was a rousing chorus of “yes!” and off we went.

We went to the North Market first, where we picked up some more strawberries from Rhoads – last weeks, although the first of the season and therefore a little less sweet (because strawberries sweeten best when the temperature is ~80F, according to Mr. Rhoads), still were much much tastier than the berries available in the grocery stores. And while I love the ease of being able to pick up a quart of great berries a the market, I still prefer picking my own, an activity in which I plan to include the young ones in within the next few weeks. After that, I’ll get to teach them about preserving and canning. I’m hoping they’ll have fond memories in the future of the time we spend together on these activities. They’re helping me out with the garden, too – there will be a short update in a few days on how that activity is going. We’re finding it necessary to redo the bones of the garden this year to rot-resistant wood and resin. More about that, and what we’ve planted so far and have yet to plant real soon.

Strawberries

I think their favorite part of the farmers market was sampling a little bit of everything: cheese, pie, salsa, honey, and more. They especially liked the cheese.

Cheese

The hothouse tomatoes are looking good this year… these will definitely do just fine until August. 

Tomatoes

And all of the lovely produce at the markets is just screaming to be made into salad – no better base for that salad than some local spring mix.

Spring Mix

I missed out on the creamed honey this week (but Paul definitely didn’t, hence the picture) – I won’t pass this up next week.

Creamed Honey

Off to Clintonville, where there were three things in great supply – crowds, dogs, and baked goods. We navigated the first two and couldn’t pass up the third. Would *you* be able to pass up a scone like this?

Scones

Next week is the first week of the outdoor market in Worthington (and also Race for the Cure, if I’m not mistaken) so we’ll probably be skipping the North Market (or visiting it last), and definitely be hitting Worthington first. So how did you fare at the markets this past weekend? What did you pick up?

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 4/28/2012

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

Well, I promised that I’d be much better about getting up the farmers market reports in a more timely manner this year – so in the interest of keeping that promise, looks like you’ll see some of this year’s posts before I finish putting up the rest of last season’s…

Happily, today was the first official day of at both the North Market and Clintonville, with my other usual Saturday market, Worthington, set to start next weekend. I was really looking forward to going today, since the whole of my season last year was from the perspective of a wheelchair. Since I’m back to being completely mobile, sans wheelchair, walker, or any assistance of any type, I was able to go back to my usual perspective of taking photos from a standing position, which makes things much, much easier.

We headed to the North Market first, with a handful (about a half dozen or so) different vendors there today, which is less than half the usual number during the peak of the growing season. I was really glad to see that they had strawberries today at Rhoads, so I picked up a quart of these beautiful berries to enjoy later.

Strawberries

I also picked a small bunch of asparagus at Wish Well Farms, to include in a farmers market spring risotto I’m planning on making tomorrow.

Asparagus

There were also French breakfast radishes to be had, which I’m going to thinly slice onto thick, buttery (made with Snowville Cream, natch) hunks of Omega’s French Country bread.

Radishes

Over to Clintonville, where I picked up a bunch of tomato, pepper and chard seedlings. Looking forward to doing some gardening in this next week.

Tomato Seedlings

Yay to ramps – which I’m going to caramelize and include in my risotto.

Ramps

They had the cutest little baby kale, too – which I unfortunately didn’t pick any up despite being sorely tempted.

Baby Kale

So, that was my market day – did you make it out today? And what did you pick up?

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 7/30/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, Produce

Since we didn’t have much of a winter to speak of this year (not complaining, mind you – it’s the first time in years I wasn’t totally incapacitated by Seasonal Affective Disorder!), it’s been pretty warm for a while now. So much so that without me realizing it, we’re almost at the time of year again where my Saturday mornings are spent at farmers markets picking up local produce, meats and cheeses to create some rather stunning meals.

Last year was a bit of a wash for me as far as the farmers markets went – I wasn’t able to go at all until near the end of July, and when I did go, Paul had to push me around in a wheelchair because I still wasn’t able to walk unassisted. Most pictures I took last year were from a seated position, with me being so totally exhausted by the time I got home that I never got the posts about those visits up at all.

I’m totally planning on starting fresh this year, back to updating right after I get back from the markets, but part of doing that is getting the rest of the posts from last year’s growing season up before embarking on covering this year. So, in the next few days, expect to see a bunch of posts about what I saw at the markets last year, which will also give you an idea on what to expect when going this year since very little changes as far as availability from year to year.

I’m also planning on putting together a list of the different markets that you can attend this year in Central Ohio (and maybe even a list for my Jersey friends, since I’m hoping to spend some time there this summer as well) – so if you know of a market I can add to the list, please add a comment to this post. Last year, I only went to my main three (North Market, Clintonville, and Worthington), so these pictures will be from one or more of those. Unfortunately, I didn’t note which was which. Oops…

Basket of Apples

Ohio Sweet Corn

Eggplant

Peaches

Hot Peppers

Flowers

Yellow Bell Peppers

Are the rest of you looking forward to going to the markets as much as I am? Which ones are your favorites, and who are your “can’t miss” farmers and vendors?

Nintendo Introduces Wii U Console

Wireless News June 10, 2011

Wireless News 06-10-2011 Nintendo Introduces Wii U Console Type: News

Nintendo introduced a new paradigm for video games and home entertainment: Wii U, a new console that includes a controller with a 6.2-inch screen.

In a release, the Company noted previously, video games played on a home console have been confined to the TV and offered identical viewpoints to each player in a multiplayer environment. Furthermore, watching TV and playing console games have been completely separate experiences. The new controller removes these boundaries, creating a more dynamic and fluid gaming and entertainment experience.

In single-player games the new controller can display information on its screen that does not appear on the TV. The information and viewpoint can also change in the new controller based on the orientation of its gyroscope.

In multiplayer games the player using the new controller can have a different experience than those looking at the TV.

In addition to the 6.2-inch screen, the new controller also features an accelerometer and a gyroscope, a rumble feature, an inward-facing camera, a microphone and speakers. Adding these features to the Classic Controller button scheme – two analog Circle Pads, +Control Pad, A/B/X/Y buttons, L/R buttons and ZL/ZR buttons – will enable a breadth of game-play experiences while appealing to both casual and dedicated video game players.

Wii U combines motion-sensing game play with the ability to support full HD graphics. Each Wii U console will be partnered with a new controller and can also use up to four additional Wii Remote or Wii Remote Plus controllers. The system is also backward compatible and can play all Wii games and use all Wii accessories. here paper mario 3ds

“Wii U redefines the structure of home entertainment by fundamentally changing how the TV, the game console and the Internet function and interact together,” said Nintendo President Satoru Iwata.

“The experience enabled by Wii U and the new controller takes players deeper into their games, while reaching out wider than ever before to be inviting to all kinds of gamers.”

Nintendo 3DS, which lets users see 3D images without the need for special glasses, launched in the United States on March 27 and continues to evolve. Owners will find that their Nintendo 3DS experience is different every time they pick up the system, thanks to new content and updates delivered by Nintendo, by third parties and exchanged between users.

A new system update is now available for the Nintendo 3DS system.

Users who connect to a wireless broadband Internet connection and install the system update will instantly gain access to the Nintendo eShop, which contains a variety of games and applications for download using a cash-based system.

Users can browse original 3D software, 3D Classics (select classic video games re-mastered in 3D), classic Game Boy and Game Boy Color games, and more than 350 games and applications currently offered for the Nintendo DSiWare service.

The system update also provides Nintendo 3DS owners access to free items, including an Internet browser that can show 3D images on sites specifically designed to show 3D images, a download of a re- mastered 3D version of the NES classic Excitebike game (free until July 7) and Pokedex 3D, which lets users discover and view more than 150 Pokemon from the Pokemon Black Version and Pokemon White Version games in visually engaging 3D.

Nintendo also announced a huge lineup of upcoming franchise games.

This includes:

-Nintendo 3DS: Super Mario, Luigi’s Mansion 2, Mario Kart, Kid Icarus: Uprising, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D, Star Fox 64 3D, Animal Crossing, Paper Mario, Picture Lives!, The Rolling Western. this web site paper mario 3ds

-Wii: The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, Kirby Wii, Wii Play: Motion, Mystery Case Files: The Malgrave Incident, Mario Party 9, Rhythm Heaven and Fortune Street.

-Nintendo DS: Kirby Mass Attack, Professor Layton and the Last Specter, Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 2 and Super Fossil Fighters.

Nintendo kicked off its E3 Expo Presentation by announcing a number of initiatives to celebrate the 25th anniversary of The Legend of Zelda. A re-mastered 3D version of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time launches for Nintendo 3DS on June 19, while Wii owners will see the arrival of The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword in the 2011 holiday season.

Nintendo creates interactive entertainment.

((Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@closeupmedia.com))

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Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Admin, Columbus, Life

For Christmas 2010, right before I got really sick, I bought myself something I had been wanting for years, but had always just stopped short of buying – a really nice DSLR camera so I could step up my game as far as food photography. People always asked me what kind of camera I use for my photos, and seemed somewhat surprised when I told them it was a fairly inexpensive point and shoot. So, Nikon D5000 in hand, I took an introductory class at Cord Camera, and part of the class was a trip to the Franklin Park Conservatory here in town so we could take pictures there. Here’s the best of what I walked away with that day:

Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Franklin Park Conservatory February 2011

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to use the camera right away (or much at all last summer) because I still lacked the strength to lift the camera and hold it steady enough to get good pictures. But I’m making a commitment to trying to get a good mastery of the camera by the end of the year – between planning to take lessons with a very talented photographer friend of mine, reading camera-specific books outlining all of the features, and lots and lots of practice shots, I’ll get the hang of it, I’m sure. In the meantime, you’ll see a mix of both types (DSLR and point and shoot) of pictures on the blog, with the eventual goal of going to all DSLR in the near future.

What resources did you find invaluable when trying to learn photography? Luckily it’s one of those fields that allows you to *always* learn something new, and I’m curious to find out what worked for others in improving their own work…

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 7/16/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

Not too many pictures from this farmers market Saturday, I’m afraid to say. I believe it was because it was my first full day at home after Dodd, and I was still trying to get used to taking pictures from a wheelchair, thus many less good ones came out. Definitely a milestone day, nonetheless.

Zucchini

Onions

Pepper Plants

Various Summer Squash

OPEN HOUSE FOR REGIONAL EVENT CENTER AUG. 22; INTRASQUAD GAME, YOUTH CLINIC ALSO PLANNED

US Fed News Service, Including US State News August 7, 2008 Southwest Minnesota State University issued the following news release:

An open house for the new Regional Event Center on the campus of Southwest Minnesota State University will be held on Friday, Aug. 22 from 5-6:30 p.m.

The event will include a Mustang Booster Club and M-Club (Marshall High School) kickoff picnic.

A brief ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at 6:10 p.m. on the field. web site marshall high school

“It’s an opportunity for people in the region to come and take a look at the new facility,” said Sara Granheim, Athletic Development Director and one of the event organizers. “There has been a lot of interest in the Regional Event Center since construction started – people have driven by and watched its progress – and this is a way for the community to see the finished product.” SMSU personnel will be stationed around the facility to answer any questions, said Granheim. marshallhighschoolnow.net marshall high school

The Regional Event Center will be home to SMSU and Marshall High School football and soccer teams, and will also host any number of events such as concerts, speakers, marching band competitions, etc.

A Young Mustangs Football Clinic for those in grades K-6 will be held from 4-5 p.m. on the Regional Event Center field, followed by the Mustang Booster Club and M-Club picnic in the concourse area.

Cost if the picnic is $5. It is free to Mustang Booster Club members.

The Mustang intrasquad scrimmage will be held from 6:30-8 p.m., followed by an autograph session with the players in the concourse area. A team picture will be given to fans for signing, and Granheim said Mustang fans may also bring other items for players to sign – t-shirts, balls, etc.

The SMSU Star of Minnesota Marching Band and the Marshall High School Marching Band will also play.

The open house is part of a full day of activities at the Regional Event Center. A ribbon-cutting ceremony for the SMSU community will be held at 9:30 a.m., followed by the SMSU convocation for incoming freshmen.

The evening concludes with a Kory & the Fireflies concert for SMSU students in the Regional Event Center plaza.Contact: Jim Tate, 800/642-0684, tatej@southwestmsu.edu.

Jim Tate, 800/642-0684, tatej@southwestmsu.edu.

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 7/9/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, Food Porn, North Market, Produce

Honey from Honeyrun Farm

Tomatoes

Fingerling Potatoes

Onions

Cauliflower

Garlic

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 7/2/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

It’s finally starting to feel like winter around here – we finally got a little snow. No more than just a dusting, but just enough to remind us winter hasn’t finished rearing its ugly head just yet. What better time to look at pictures from last summer’s farmers markets, and to start counting down the days until it’s that time again…

Cabbage

Small Red Potatoes

Eight Ball Squash

Blueberries

Pickling Cucumbers

Lettuce

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 6/25/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Farmer's Market, Food Porn, Produce

Got home late last night, and didn’t get to bed until nearly 6am, so I slept in most of today. Putting together the entry for the FreshStreet pop up at Noodlecat as we speak, will hopefully have more for you tomorrow. In the meantime, enjoy (vicariously, much as I did during the date) these pictures of what we have to look forward to on Saturdays in early summer.

Tomatoes

Lettuce

Radishes

Flowers

Parsley

Cabbage

Learning on their laptops Dist. 54 to provide some grades with iBooks.(News)

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL) February 25, 2003 | Singh, Shruti Date Byline: Shruti Date Singh Daily Herald Staff Writer Dooley School teacher Jennifer Antonson is excited about the prospect of each of her students getting a laptop computer.

Her sixth-graders could research and write their English papers right at their desks, and they could read about history for social studies as current events occur, Antonson pointed out.

“I think back 20 years ago. A school wouldn’t even consider not having a set of encyclopedias,” said Antonson from her Schaumburg school. “This is a new resource every child should have access to.” Schaumburg Township Elementary District 54 plans to give every student in grades four, five and six an Apple iBook laptop to use during the school year. The District 54 school board approved the project on Thursday. in our site ibooks for mac

The laptops will be phased in over the next three years. This fall, District 54 will provide laptops to about 1,700 students in seven of its 22 elementary schools. Another seven or eight elementary schools will receive laptops for their fourth-, fifth- and sixth graders beginning in the 2004-2005 school year. The remaining elementary schools will receive laptops for students in these grades beginning in the 2005-2006 school year. When the program is at its peak, about 5,100 students and dozens of staff members will work daily on laptops.

Each phase will cost about $2.1 million for hardware, software, training and support.

Officials said despite the budgetary constraints school districts face in this tough economy, they plan to pay for the program by reallocating money, and they won’t dip into reserves.

District 54 spokesperson Terri McHugh said each year the district spends money for various types of technology – from software licenses to desktop computers. She said, for example, in the upcoming school year the district would not need to buy desktop computers and would buy laptops instead.

The district this spring will choose the seven schools that will receive the first batch of Apple iBooks, based on current technology network and skills and strength of leadership in the building.

District 54 officials said along with books and blackboards, in this day and age laptops are logical learning tools for English, science, social studies or any other subject.

“We believe technology has to be woven into the subject,” said Marianne Zito, District 54 assistant superintendent for instructional services. “This is a modern-day book.” Zito said through the use of laptops, the district intends to enhance reading and writing skills, improve students’ connection with outside resources in a monitored environment and beef up technical skills. website ibooks for mac

She said the district hopes to equip these students with computer skills they can use in high school, college and the workforce.

“It certainly opens up the door to see what skills they will need in the future,” she said.

Through a pilot program conducted this fall in nine classrooms, students used the laptops to write journals, create presentations and do research on the Internet. District officials said teacher, parents and student surveys revealed the children were more motivated to work on assignments in school and at home, and they spent more time reading and writing.

Students also took laptops home everyday, which enabled them to show parents exactly what they did at school that day – something that moms and dads always want to know.

District officials said the results of the pilot program gave them qualitative information, but the program is too new for firm quantitative data about the improvement in literacy or technical skills.

Indeed, District 54 is one of just a handful of educational institutions implementing this program.

The Maine Department of Education launched an initiative this school year through which all seventh-grade students and teachers across the state receive iBooks. The department plans to provide all eighth-graders with laptops beginning the next school year.

When the $37 million state-funded Maine Learning Technology Initiative is in full swing, nearly 36,000 students and teachers will receive these laptops.

Tony Sprague, project manager of the Maine Learning Technology Initiative, said it’s too early to make definitive judgments about the benefits, but the enthusiasm the laptops generate among students is evident.

He said during a pilot program the state conducted last academic year, attendance improved dramatically during the nine weeks students received the laptops.

Henrico County Public Schools, a Virginia school system that provides laptops to nearly 25,000 high school and middle school students and teachers, also has noticed some preliminary benefits. The $21 million laptop program began in 2001.

School officials said last year, scores for the U.S. history section of the standardized high school U.S. Standard of Learning exam jumped 20 points from the year before. U.S. history was the only completely digitized subject in the district.

“They’ve benefited by all having access. When you look how fast info moves … this is the way the world is moving,” said Janet Binns, director of public relations for the Henrico County Public Schools.

Singh, Shruti Date