May is for Foodies!

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Charity, Columbus, Events, North Market

May is always, always one of my favorite months of the year – if not for the great weather (the cold snaps of early spring are behind us, and the weather is still cool enough to enjoy spending time outdoors), then definitely for the events for food lovers that are held this month. Today I’m going to talk about a couple of my favorites – the Taste of Dine Originals and the North Market Apron Gala.

Last May, I was definitely in a whole different place than I’m in this year – I started out the month with a slim to none prognosis of survival, with the best case scenario was that even if I managed to make it through my acute respiratory distress alive, I’d be tethered to a ventilator for my remaining time on earth, which would probably be no longer than a year because human lungs aren’t designed to handle that kind of stress before other organ systems start to fail one by one. When I woke up the second week of May, I was still a bit delusional about my condition – here I was unable to even sit up in bed without falling over, but still thought somehow that I’d be recovered enough in the next week or two to handle all of my usual May events. What the heck was I thinking? But miracles do happen, for sure, and I’m fortunate enough to not only be fully recovered, but to be able to attend both events that are near and dear to me for a multitude of reasons. And you can see why this year is extra special to me.

Lamb Sirloin with Sweet Pea and Minted Pesto from Basi Italia

Tonight’s event, the Taste of Dine Originals, lets the 50 member restaurants of Dine Originals Columbus put their best food forward, offering delicious examples of what makes them restaurants that I’m happy to patronize. Each one is different, and the variety of restaurants that belong (all independents, natch) are a direct reflection of the awesome mix of people we have in our fine capital city. There are fine dining options to go along with the casual spots, ethnic or as American as apple pie, spots at all price points, spots that are open all day, spots that are only open for a few hours a night. In addition to trying dishes from some of my favorite local chefs, there are also other reasons to go – a new venue, local wines and microbrews, and new this year, Edible Columbus is hosting a Food & Artisan Fair at the event, which offers local farmers and artisan food producers to offer samples and information about their methods, farms and products.

Parfait of Walnut Cake with Buttercream Espresso from Alana's Food and Wine

The food is always fabulous at the event – you can see my coverage of previous years here: 2010, 2009.

According to the event planners, “Our signature annual event, Taste of Dine Originals, is one of Ohio’s best food and wine events, featuring tastings and samplings from 50 regional restaurants, 30 vineyards, 2 craft breweries, and a couple of micro distilleries. Whether you’re a seasoned foodie or an intrigued beginner, chefs, brew masters, and winery representatives welcome you as they mix useful knowledge with tastings of signature dishes and interesting beverages. The silent auction features cooking lessons, private dinners, special events, works of art and rare bottles of wine. This year’s event will be held at Capital University’s Capital Center, at 2360 East Mound Street, Columbus, OH 43209. The event will be open from 6-9:30pm. Tickets are $100, proceeds from this event are shared by Dine Originals Columbus and The Buckeye Ranch, which offers mental health treatment and alcohol and drug services for children. Dine Originals Columbus celebrates, supports and promotes the culinary diversity that locally owned and operated member restaurants contribute to the identity and culture of our city. We are committed to strengthening the local economy and enriching our community through education and charitable partnerships. The Buckeye Ranch and Dine Originals both support this community and strive, each in their own manner, to make Central Ohio a better place for everyone.

Later this month is the other event that is one of my annual favorites, the North Market Apron Gala – we’ve personally been attending since 2006 (Paul attended last year, although I couldn’t make it). In many ways the event is the same from year to year, but with each passing year the landscape of the North Market has changed – it is a living, breathing entity unto itself which has its own ebbs and flows – as old favorites disappear, new favorites appear in their place. No matter what, each year is worth attending – not only does it help support a vibrant public market, but it’s also one of those events that you can’t go five feet without seeing someone you know. Catching up with everyone while noshing on delicious food? Count me in!

Pastry from Mozart's

This year, the event is being held on Saturday, May 19th from 7-10pm. Tickets are $75 per person and are available online or through the North Market Business Office (2nd floor of the market at 59 Spruce St, Columbus). Call 614-463-9664 for more information.

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 5/5/2012

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

Here it is the second full week of the 2012 growing season, and this week it was especially crowded because both the Market to Market Ride and the Half Marathon were being held at the same time. Because of that, finding parking was a little more difficult, and the North Market especially was very crowded. Good news for the farmers that sell there, not so good news for us. We finally did manage to find parking (in part because that part of Spruce St. was closed to thru traffic). And this week we had three very special little ones with us – my nephew Brandon and my nieces Autumn and Amber. They had never been to a farmers market and when I tried to explain it to them, they didn’t quite understand it (because they’re used to only seeing fruits and vegetables in the grocery store), so I asked them if they’d like to come along. There was a rousing chorus of “yes!” and off we went.

We went to the North Market first, where we picked up some more strawberries from Rhoads – last weeks, although the first of the season and therefore a little less sweet (because strawberries sweeten best when the temperature is ~80F, according to Mr. Rhoads), still were much much tastier than the berries available in the grocery stores. And while I love the ease of being able to pick up a quart of great berries a the market, I still prefer picking my own, an activity in which I plan to include the young ones in within the next few weeks. After that, I’ll get to teach them about preserving and canning. I’m hoping they’ll have fond memories in the future of the time we spend together on these activities. They’re helping me out with the garden, too – there will be a short update in a few days on how that activity is going. We’re finding it necessary to redo the bones of the garden this year to rot-resistant wood and resin. More about that, and what we’ve planted so far and have yet to plant real soon.

Strawberries

I think their favorite part of the farmers market was sampling a little bit of everything: cheese, pie, salsa, honey, and more. They especially liked the cheese.

Cheese

The hothouse tomatoes are looking good this year… these will definitely do just fine until August. 

Tomatoes

And all of the lovely produce at the markets is just screaming to be made into salad – no better base for that salad than some local spring mix.

Spring Mix

I missed out on the creamed honey this week (but Paul definitely didn’t, hence the picture) – I won’t pass this up next week.

Creamed Honey

Off to Clintonville, where there were three things in great supply – crowds, dogs, and baked goods. We navigated the first two and couldn’t pass up the third. Would *you* be able to pass up a scone like this?

Scones

Next week is the first week of the outdoor market in Worthington (and also Race for the Cure, if I’m not mistaken) so we’ll probably be skipping the North Market (or visiting it last), and definitely be hitting Worthington first. So how did you fare at the markets this past weekend? What did you pick up?

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 4/28/2012

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

Well, I promised that I’d be much better about getting up the farmers market reports in a more timely manner this year – so in the interest of keeping that promise, looks like you’ll see some of this year’s posts before I finish putting up the rest of last season’s…

Happily, today was the first official day of at both the North Market and Clintonville, with my other usual Saturday market, Worthington, set to start next weekend. I was really looking forward to going today, since the whole of my season last year was from the perspective of a wheelchair. Since I’m back to being completely mobile, sans wheelchair, walker, or any assistance of any type, I was able to go back to my usual perspective of taking photos from a standing position, which makes things much, much easier.

We headed to the North Market first, with a handful (about a half dozen or so) different vendors there today, which is less than half the usual number during the peak of the growing season. I was really glad to see that they had strawberries today at Rhoads, so I picked up a quart of these beautiful berries to enjoy later.

Strawberries

I also picked a small bunch of asparagus at Wish Well Farms, to include in a farmers market spring risotto I’m planning on making tomorrow.

Asparagus

There were also French breakfast radishes to be had, which I’m going to thinly slice onto thick, buttery (made with Snowville Cream, natch) hunks of Omega’s French Country bread.

Radishes

Over to Clintonville, where I picked up a bunch of tomato, pepper and chard seedlings. Looking forward to doing some gardening in this next week.

Tomato Seedlings

Yay to ramps – which I’m going to caramelize and include in my risotto.

Ramps

They had the cutest little baby kale, too – which I unfortunately didn’t pick any up despite being sorely tempted.

Baby Kale

So, that was my market day – did you make it out today? And what did you pick up?

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 7/16/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

Not too many pictures from this farmers market Saturday, I’m afraid to say. I believe it was because it was my first full day at home after Dodd, and I was still trying to get used to taking pictures from a wheelchair, thus many less good ones came out. Definitely a milestone day, nonetheless.

Zucchini

Onions

Pepper Plants

Various Summer Squash

OPEN HOUSE FOR REGIONAL EVENT CENTER AUG. 22; INTRASQUAD GAME, YOUTH CLINIC ALSO PLANNED

US Fed News Service, Including US State News August 7, 2008 Southwest Minnesota State University issued the following news release:

An open house for the new Regional Event Center on the campus of Southwest Minnesota State University will be held on Friday, Aug. 22 from 5-6:30 p.m.

The event will include a Mustang Booster Club and M-Club (Marshall High School) kickoff picnic.

A brief ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at 6:10 p.m. on the field. web site marshall high school

“It’s an opportunity for people in the region to come and take a look at the new facility,” said Sara Granheim, Athletic Development Director and one of the event organizers. “There has been a lot of interest in the Regional Event Center since construction started – people have driven by and watched its progress – and this is a way for the community to see the finished product.” SMSU personnel will be stationed around the facility to answer any questions, said Granheim. marshallhighschoolnow.net marshall high school

The Regional Event Center will be home to SMSU and Marshall High School football and soccer teams, and will also host any number of events such as concerts, speakers, marching band competitions, etc.

A Young Mustangs Football Clinic for those in grades K-6 will be held from 4-5 p.m. on the Regional Event Center field, followed by the Mustang Booster Club and M-Club picnic in the concourse area.

Cost if the picnic is $5. It is free to Mustang Booster Club members.

The Mustang intrasquad scrimmage will be held from 6:30-8 p.m., followed by an autograph session with the players in the concourse area. A team picture will be given to fans for signing, and Granheim said Mustang fans may also bring other items for players to sign – t-shirts, balls, etc.

The SMSU Star of Minnesota Marching Band and the Marshall High School Marching Band will also play.

The open house is part of a full day of activities at the Regional Event Center. A ribbon-cutting ceremony for the SMSU community will be held at 9:30 a.m., followed by the SMSU convocation for incoming freshmen.

The evening concludes with a Kory & the Fireflies concert for SMSU students in the Regional Event Center plaza.Contact: Jim Tate, 800/642-0684, tatej@southwestmsu.edu.

Jim Tate, 800/642-0684, tatej@southwestmsu.edu.

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 7/9/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, Food Porn, North Market, Produce

Honey from Honeyrun Farm

Tomatoes

Fingerling Potatoes

Onions

Cauliflower

Garlic

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 7/2/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

It’s finally starting to feel like winter around here – we finally got a little snow. No more than just a dusting, but just enough to remind us winter hasn’t finished rearing its ugly head just yet. What better time to look at pictures from last summer’s farmers markets, and to start counting down the days until it’s that time again…

Cabbage

Small Red Potatoes

Eight Ball Squash

Blueberries

Pickling Cucumbers

Lettuce

Event: 2011 North Market Apron Gala

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Charity, Columbus, Events, North Market

Sad to say, I wasn’t able to make it to the Apron Gala this past year. I held an unrealistic hope that I’d be well enough to attend, but that would have depended on me getting off a ventilator, getting my trach removed, and being able to hold myself upright in a matter of 2 short weeks after being in a medically induced coma for over a month. When I plan, I plan big. I was depressed about missing it – it was the first time in many years that I missed both the North Market Apron Gala *and* the Taste of Dine Originals events. Paul, like a trooper, went in my place, and managed to get quite a few nice pictures. But this year? I’m going to go, and will actually wear an apron this year. Save the date, it’s just a few short months away now on Saturday, May 19th. More details as the date gets closer. In the meantime, enjoy these pics of last year’s event. The link to the slideshow of all pictures can be found at the bottom of this entry.

Vegetable Stromboli from Sarefino's

Mixed Baby Green Salad at Pastaria

Pastry from Mozart's

Summer Rolls from Lan Viet

Chicken Salad from Kitchen Little

Ham Balls from Bluescreek

Slideshow:

Farm Fresh and Local Produce 6/4/2011

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Farmer's Market, North Market, Produce

When the farmers markets started up for the season, I unfortunately was still in the hospital being weaned off a ventilator and hopelessly weak (I couldn’t even sit up without toppling over). Going to the farmers market is the one thing that grounds me, no matter how frenetic the rest of my life is at any given time. It’s a yearly ritual that I hadn’t missed for years. Paul did a great job going to the markets for me, taking plenty of pictures, and bringing me fresh fruits and veggies (btw, a quick shout out to the folks at Select Specialty Hospital is in order – they were so great in adjusting my meals to make things that I could tolerate eating – their veggie omelet (which included whatever fresh veggies they had laying around, along with some nice melty cheese) is one of my fond memories of that time. The other biggie? The shampoo cap that was super relaxing – go figure.

I’m planning on attending the first markets of the year later this spring. Going without asparagus and morels and ramps and other spring goodies had me a little bit down, as did not being able to plant or tend to my garden. This year, nothing will keep me from picking up where I left off before I got sick. All of these pictures were taken at the North Market, if my memory serves right.

So, as the temperature plummets tonight and a little bit of snow falls, look at these pics as a reminder of what’s to come in just a few short months…what spring rituals are you most looking forward to?

Strawberries

Praying Mantis Nests

Heart Shaped Cucumber

Grape Tomatoes

Green Onions

Asparagus

Obituary: Lucienne Bloch

The Independent (London, England) April 3, 1999 | Nick Caistor BORN IN Switzerland in 1909, living most of her long life in the United States, the artist Lucienne Bloch is best-known internationally for her friendship with a Mexican couple.

The first record of Lucienne is as a small child in her birthplace Geneva, photographed with her brother and sister by her father, the composer Ernst Bloch. Bloch was also a photographer and taught Lucienne how to develop photographs as a child. In 1917, Bloch sailed with his family across the Atlantic to take up a position in New York, and a few years later became director of the Institute of Music in Cleveland and then, from 1925, of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. He had a somewhat tempestuous relationship with his wife, who after a few years took her children back to Paris. detroitinstituteofartsnow.net detroit institute of arts

Lucienne studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and spent a year making glass sculptures in Amsterdam. Returning once more to the United States, it was in 1931 that she both held a one-man show of her glass in New York and first met the formidable Mexican painters Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. In her diary, Bloch recalled that this was at a dinner in Rivera’s honour in New York, where she was seated next to the great man, much to the irritation of the jealous Kahlo, whose first words to the bemused young Swiss woman were: “I hate you.” Soon though, Kahlo became satisfied that Bloch was not infatuated with her husband, and over the next few years, she became Kahlo’s faithful companion, accompanying her during the difficult loss of her child, and the death of her mother, and even travelled to Mexico with her. On one occasion, in August 1932, Bloch wrote in her diary: “We took cold chicken in a little basket and went to Belle Isle dragging Diego with us at the last instant. It did him good to go out. He was so surprised at the beauty of the trees when lying down in the grass. He says trees are ugly and nature is hokum, but he can’t help admiring it when he’s in it.” Bloch herself was a talented sculptor – Frank Lloyd Wright offered her the post of sculpture director at his school in Wisconsin. But she was particularly impressed with the public murals that Diego Rivera was busily creating in Mexico and the United States, and instead became Rivera’s assistant. She also fell in love with his chief plasterer, the Bulgarian Stephen Dimitroff. She helped on Rivera’s most controversial projects, at the Detroit Institute of Art, and on Man at the Crossroads, for the Rockefeller Center in New York. Nelson Rockefeller had commissioned the 1,000sqft work, but the Rockefeller family was horrified when it discovered that Rivera intended to make it a paean in praise of Communism, with Lenin as the great spiritual leader of mankind. Rivera was quickly paid off, and armed guards moved in while the mural was covered with screens. Bloch attempted to defend it, even going so far as to scrawl on the whitewashed windows of the Rockefeller Center: “Workers unite! Help protect Rivera M-” – at which point, she was dragged away. She returned however, on 8 May 1933, with Dimitroff and Kahlo, and while Kahlo distracted the guards, Bloch climbed up on the scaffold and with her camera managed to capture the only images of the mural to survive. Throughout the 1930s, Bloch continued to work as a muralist and sculptor in glass and terracotta. She and Dimitroff married and became an artistic fresco team, he handling the plaster and she the painting on around 50 projects around America. Her photographs of Frida Kahlo were widely shown, but she also took photos for Life magazine, again demonstrating her strong political convictions, as in the series of striking carworkers in late 1930s. Dimitroff became a union organiser until the couple moved to California in the 1960s. Towards the end of her life, there was a renewed interest in Lucienne Bloch’s work. The singer Madonna, researching for a film project about Frida Kahlo, talked with her at length and set up a fund to preserve the best of her murals, The Evolution of Music, in the George Washington High School in New York. From 1965 Bloch lived in Gualala, California, and it was here that the first exhibition of her photographs of Frida Kahlo was recently held. Lucienne Bloch, muralist: born Geneva 1909; married Stephen Dimitroff (died 1996; two sons, one daughter); died Gualala, California 13 March 1999. see here detroit institute of arts

Nick Caistor

Visiting the Farmers Markets Vicariously

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Farmer's Market, Food Porn, North Market, Produce

I’ve been sick for so long that being able to a farmers market is a dream to work toward. In the meantime, i’m going to post some yet-unpublished pictures to remind myself and you all of what to look forward to.

Check out all my pics from last year’s markets in the slideshow below.


 

Paul has been hitting the markets the past few weeks so stay tuned for ongoing market reports from the 2011 growing season.

North Market Jelly & Jam Contest 2009

Author: paulboyer  //  Category: Columbus, Contest, North Market

Original Post Date: 8/20/2009

My wife, Columbus Foodie, will tell anyone willing to listen that for all my faults, I’m one HELL of a cannin’ fool.  I’ve singlehandedly canned all manner of jams, preserves, and now jellies since we’ve gotten into the whole food preservation thing.  Heck, right now I’ve got a tub of stinky little four-inch lovelies — pickling cukes — fermenting on the basement landing, where the temperature remains a comfortable 66 to 70 degrees (perfect to turn cucumbers into tasty tasty garlic dills).

Alas, that’s a story for another day.

Earlier this season, the mulberry tree in our backyard was literally bursting with dark little packages of berrylicious wonderfulness, and Dear Wifey made a point of gathering as many as she could as often as she could.  Additionally, her mother’s boyfriend, whom I will refer to simply as “J”, gathered a boatload of mulberries from a tree near their property for my use.

This provided me with about a gallon to a gallon and a half of fully ripened, plump, juicy, yet seedy mulberries a week for nearly a month.  What’s a man to do with such a bounty?    TURN THEM INTO JELLY!  Over the course of that early summer month, I mashed, boiled, strained, jellified and canned at least 20-25 eight ounce jars of glistening purple bliss and gave away a significant share of them to friends and family.  Thus, it was a no brainer to submit (especially at Columbus Foodie’s insistence) my Mulberry Jelly to the mercy of the judges at the Columbus North Market’s 2009 Jelly and Jam Contest.

I arrived early, and submitted my entry to the first organizer to arrive.  Thus, my mulberry jelly was the first product sampled by the judges.  Whether this hurt my chances of placing high, I’ll never know (I did not win or place).  By the time the judging was ready to begin, a total of fifteen entries had been received.  Here are some of the competitors:

Jelly & Jam Contest Entries at the North Market 8/15/09

Here are the rest (forgive the overlap, it couldn’t be helped):

More Jelly & Jam Contest Entries at the North Market 8/15/09

As you can see, my offering was merely one among many; there were quite a few interesting submissions.  The winning Organic Concord Grape Jelly fully deserved its prize, as it was one of the best grape jellies I’ve ever tasted.  Other notables included a sangria jelly, a lavender black&blue preserve, a hot pepper jelly, several cherry jams, and a blackberry jam which was quite good in my opinion.

All in all, it was an interesting and entertaining competition.  Expect to see me there again next year.