Oma's Potato Salad

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Ethnic, Oma, Recipes

I love my sister Maurya’s potato salad (more about that in an upcoming entry) – really, I do. So much so that I will make her recipe 80% of the time we’re having it. However, there’s something about Thurn’s garlic knockers that call out for my Oma’s potato salad. It’s the simplest recipe ever, and everyone who has tasted it has loved it. I’ve remembered it all these years simply because it is so easy and so good. Hopefully, you will love it as well. It uses ingredients that one normally has on hand, and can be whipped up in no time flat.

Oma's Potato Salad

Oma’s Potato Salad

3 lbs. small yellow potatoes (such as Yukon Golds)
1 small to medium white onion, chopped
Cider vinegar, to taste
Mayonnaise, to taste
Salt, to taste

Place unpeeled potatoes in a pot of boiling water, and allow to boil until just tender but still firm (about 10-15 minutes). When done, rinse with cold water to stop the cooking process, and then lay the potatoes on a paper towel to cool down. When cool enough to touch, peel and slice the potatoes into a large bowl. After each pound of potatoes is sliced and layered in the bowl, sprinkle liberally with cider vinegar, one third of the onions, and salt. Add mayo to bowl – you want it to be just enough mayo to hold the salad together, so be careful not to add too much. Check one more time for taste, and add vinegar, salt or mayo as needed to achieve the flavor that you like best. Can be served cold or warm, is great both ways!

LONGEVITY MARRIED 50 YEARS: LARRY AND BETTY HORNER

Daily News (Los Angeles, CA) November 8, 2004 | – Nicole Sunkes Larry and Betty Horner of Thousand Oaks celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with their family on June 5 at the North Ranch Country Club in Westlake Village.

They met at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indianapolis where they both worked for the federal government, and Larry had just returned from the Korean War. They were married in Anderson, Ind., at the Second Methodist Church. They moved to Westlake Village in 1968. go to website los robles hospital

Larry earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Indiana University. When they moved to Westlake Village, they became active in civic affairs. Larry became president of the Westlake Athletic Association and president of Foxmoor and Westlake joint homeowners’ associations. He was a former vice president at Northrop Grumman and retired after spending 41 years in the aerospace industry. He also served four terms on the Thousand Oaks City Council spanning 16 1/2 years. Currently, he is working as Senior District Adviser for Congressman Brad Sherman.

Betty graduated from Indiana University. She is a member of Volunteers in Policing, member and past-president of the Westlake Women’s Club, a member of the Civic Arts Plaza, and the Conejo Valley Historical Society. She is on the Board of Trustees for Los Robles Hospital, on the R.S.V.P. Advisory Board, on the Crime Stoppers Board of Directors and a member of Conejo Friends. here los robles hospital

They were recently honored by the Thousand Oaks City Council for their golden anniversary, and have each been honored as Man and Woman of the year by the Chamber of Commerce.

Larry and Betty plan on traveling to Indiana later this year to retrace the beginning of their relationship. They also plan on celebrating in New York as well.

They have three children: Cynthia of New York, Larry Jr. of Simi Valley and Kymberly of Thousand Oaks.

- Nicole Sunkes

A Little Bit of Germany in Columbus

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Columbus, Eating Local, Ethnic, Holiday, Oma

The Christmas memories of my childhood are often punctuated by thoughts of the baked goods they used to make for the holidays. My grandfather’s stollen had a prominent place In those memories, and so did German style cookies. Holidays were big in their household, going over there on Christmas Eve every year was something I looked forward to all year.

Bierberg Bakery Outside

In the heart of German Village (where else did you think it would be?) there is a little shop, only open for 2 months a year, that sells old fashioned German cookies, the kind that is just perfect for serving with coffee or cocoa. They closed for the year on Christmas Eve, and unfortunately I didn’t make it there this year – they do, however, make the same things from year to year, so this will give you an idea of what to expect.

Bierberg Bakery Cookies

Posting this today (on the 16th anniversary of my Oma’s death) is a bit bittersweet, but in a good way. So many good memories to cherish that don’t fade away one bit as the years pass by. Even though she’s been gone a while, I still hold her close to my heart and feel like one day, somehow, some way, we’ll be together again.

What holiday traditions of your childhood are a part of your current celebrations? Which ones started with your generation and will continue for years to come?

If you’d like to go (unfortunately, you’ll have to wait until fall): Bierberg Bakery, 729 S. 5th Street, Columbus (German Village), 614-443-9959

Christmas Traditions

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Holiday, Life, Oma

Here it is, very early on Christmas morning and I’ve been thinking about our families’ traditions through the years – Christmas has always been a pretty big deal when I was growing up, and fortunately, we’ve continued that trend through our generation and the next. But I thought it would be a nice time to get away from talking about food, and taking a moment to talk about the sense of family and togetherness that is behind the holiday.

As long as I can remember, and even before, Christmas Eve was a bigger deal than Christmas Day, because it was when we’d go and visit family. Even baby me was taken around to see the relatives. I love this picture, because it show the tree that my Oma and Opa put up for Christmas. Yes, that’s the Christmas tree – even as a baby, I towered over it. This is me with the tree on Christmas Eve 1973.

Becke, Christmas Eve 1973

I spent my first couple of years with my maternal grandmother (Edith Mama was what I always called her) because my mom was taking some time away to get her life together so she’d have a suitable home to bring me up in, and my grandmother and my maternal great-grandmother (Oma) were inseparable. Needless to say, that meant I spent a lot of time over there, including the holidays. She died when I was very young of a heart attack (at age 46), but I still think of her often, especially during holidays – I wish I had the opportunity to get to know her better.

Becke with Edith Mama, Christmas 1973

At 6, I still believed in Santa, so needless to say I thought it was the real thing. This is me and Santa during Christmas 1978.

Becke & Santa, Christmas 1978

From my earliest memories, I remember that we had a tradition every Christmas Eve, to visit all of the relatives in the same order every year. The first stop on the trip was to my Grandmom Jones, my paternal grandmother and to my Aunt Doreen, who lived with her.

Grandmom Jones always had milk and cookies, coffee or tea for the adults, and a kind word for everyone. And she was an equal opportunity Grandmom to everyone – even though my sister Maurya was not her granddaughter by blood, she treated her just like she was. What a wonderful woman. She died a few years ago, and I regret not visiting her more often.

Grandmom Jones

My Aunt Doreen always had a child-like excitement about Christmas, and her excitement was contagious. I think she enjoyed the holiday most of all.

Aunt Doreen

This is a picture of me, my Grandmom Jones and my sister Maurya in like 1983 or so.

Grandmom Jones, Maurya and Me

After going to my Grandmom Jones’ house, it was off to visit Nana and Puh, my great-grandparents on my mom’s paternal side. They lived in a trailer in South Jersey part of the year, but also lived in Massachusetts (or was it New Hampshire?) as well, so they had these really cool Bostonian accents. Here is my sister Maurya at 2 or 3 years old with Puh.

Maurya and Puh, Christmas Eve 1982

Nana, as a Christmas gift every year, would knit or crochet some of the ugliest hats, scarfs, etc. ever. But since it was your Nana, and since you know that she put love and care into it, would thank her profusely while thinking in the back of your mind that you’d never been seen in public with it on unless you were going to visit Nana. I’m sure all of us have gotten that kind of Nana gift. ;-) Here’s Nana with Maurya.

Nana & Maurya, January 1982

I believe that they passed away sometime in the late 80′s or early 90′s in their eighties, and again, they are sadly missed. My mom could pinpoint the dates for sure, since she’s really into genealogy, a hobby that Puh got her started in by gifting her with a family tree that he had started and that she later on seriously expanded.

My mom has many of the same Christmas memories that I have, because they spanned generations. Here she is with Opa at Christmas when she was a young child.

Mom with Opa

And here I am with Opa, on Christmas Eve, almost 30 years later. Notice that my right eye is almost swollen shut. Nana and Puh had 2 Siamese that I had a severe allergy to, so all pictures of me at Christmas at Oma’s and Opa’s have that same oh-so-flattering look.

Opa and Becke, Christmas Eve 1982

Unfortunately, I couldn’t locate a picture of Oma and me during Christmas, because she was usually the one behind the camera taking pictures of me and Opa. And they took TONS of pictures. I don’t think a week of my childhood went by where there wasn’t a picture taken. This is Oma and me (as a baby), but it’s a great representation of how to age gracefully. To me, my Oma was the most beautiful person in the world. Quite literally, she *was* my world growing up – the person who kept me centered, who was always supportive, and who always wanted the best for me. She died in 1995, and I still miss her like crazy. Each milestone of my life, I get a bit sad that she couldn’t be there. In many ways, I live my life now as a tribute to her – I always try to do the right thing that would make her proud.

Me and Oma

But the Christmas Eve festivities at Oma’s and Opa’s rocked. They would transform my playroom in the attic into a magical Christmas wonderland, with decorations, homemade cookies and other goodies, and presents out the wazoo. Oh, how I always looked forward to that day. Even Maurya got in on it, when she was old enough to understand what was going on. Here she is at all of 2 years getting a present from Opa.

Maurya Christmas Eve 1982

Afterward, we’d head back home and go to sleep, so we could get up at the crack of dawn in the morning to open presents. By then, I didn’t believe in Santa, but I wasn’t going to spoil the magic for my little sister. Here is a pic of me, my sister Maurya and my mom in front of the Christmas tree.

Maurya, Mom, and Becke - Christmas 1982

Mom, like most Mom’s, always locked herself into the bedroom to wrap presents so we wouldn’t walk in on her.

Mom, Christmas 1982

In morning, we’d tear our presents open like little bandits. This particular year, I got a Sony Walkman. I spent the next few months with it as a permanent attachment.

Becke Christmas 1982

My sister, I think, was more interested in tearing the paper to pieces than what was inside. Although, if it was something Smurf related, she’d let out a squee.

Maurya, Christmas 1982

We’ve kept a few of the traditions (opening a gift on Christmas eve, doing Christmas baking, etc) but we’ve ended up making many new ones of our own too. Here’s our tree this year – our old tree’s lights went belly up last year so we replaced it with a white one, which is kind of retro. Every year we get a commemorative personalized ornament for our tree listing the names of us and our pets. Since we don’t have kids of our own, we end up spoiling our nephew and nieces. I honestly get more pleasure out of giving than receiving. I’ve been blessed in so many ways, and love to pay it forward for the handful of people I care deeply for.

Our Xmas Tree 2010

Tomorrow, we’re going to my sister’s for Christmas dinner. I’ve decided to hand it off to her after doing it the last decade or so. And tomorrow we’ll create new memories, and new traditions. And afterwards, I can take you vicariously through how our family celebrates the holidays.

What traditions does your family have?

Garden Update: May 2009

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Eating Local, Gardening, Oma, Produce

Gardening is something of a family tradition for us. My great-grandfather (who we called Opa) made a living as a gardener when he emigrated from Germany around 60 years ago, so there was never a time growing up where I can’t remember Opa having a vegetable garden, or a time where I don’t have memories of helping him out in the garden. The same could be said for my mother. He started her out at an early age, and here’s the evidence: a picture of her with Opa and her mother in 1954, where at a little over 2 years old, she’s right there with him with a miniature hoe of her own.

3 Generations of Gardeners - March 1954

So gardening is definitely in the blood, although I don’t remember much of those early lessons. Oddly enough, I can still remember the exact placement of all of the vegetables in his garden – isn’t it funny how the mind works? There are fleeting remembrances of cold frames and growing green beans and cucumbers and tomatoes and spinach, and memories of sitting in the yard with Oma snapping the ends off of those beans so that she could make Bohnegemüse which she’d then freeze for preservation so that we could enjoy nature’s bounty during the cold New Jersey winters.

That desire to garden laid pretty much dormant until we built a house of our own in 2004. I started that year with something simple – herbs grown in containers on my porch rail, and some tomatoes grown in the front bed – although not pretty, it was quite bountiful. As the years have passed, we’ve expanded a bit – we have a deck now where we didn’t before, and we have a fence now, so the growing space expanded with the home improvements. Last year we grew tomatoes and peppers in containers on the back deck. This year, we put in an honest-to-goodness permanent garden, which we’ll continue to use year after year.

Please click on through and join me on a tour of how my garden started out. I’ll share my progress month-by-month, including some of my harvest. It’s amazing to see how quickly things have progressed.

Read more…

Kartoffelsalat mit Würstchen

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Food Porn, Oma, Recipes

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If there’s one staple to the German diet, one dish that every German housewife makes, it would be potato salad and sausages. There are as many different recipes as there are housewives, but this one from East Meets West is the closest I’ve found to my Oma’s recipe. It has a wonderful flavor to it, nice and vinegary and salty from the bacon without being too sweet like many recipes for German potato salads are. My husband put it all together, and raved about what little touches like cooking the potatoes in beef broth did to the final flavor to the dish. We served it with some frankfurters from Thurn’s, to which we added a touch of butter to the pan at the end to enhance the browning and add a bit more of a crunch to the casing. Perfect combination of food, and a dish we hope to make again real soon. We kept the recipe mostly intact, the only difference we made was using double-smoked bacon from Thurn’s which we diced up before sauteeing it.

I’m submitting to this week’s Bookmarked Recipes event. Check Ruth’s site for the roundup!

Kartoffelsalat and Wurstchen

Kartoffelsalat mit Würstchen
recipe slightly modified from East Meets West

1 Kg Potatoes
Meat Stock (of which 200ml goes into the salad)
200g Bacon (we used slab double-smoked, which we diced)
1 Onion or 2 Shallots (half to be cooked and the other half used raw)
1 Tbsp Oil
3-4 Tbsp good quality White Wine Vinegar
2-3 Tbsp Mayonnaise
1-2 Tsp Moutard de Dijon
Salt and Pepper to taste
Spring onions for garnishing

Peel the potatoes and boil them in the meat stock (I used 2 beef bones for it). Remove the cooked potatoes and cut them into cubes. Set aside 200ml of the meat stock for the salad.

In the wok fry the bacon till browned. Remove and drain on kitchen towels. Cut into smaller pieces.

Add some oil in the wok and brown half the onions or shallots. Add in the cooked potatoes and meat stock. Simmer a little and then pour in the oil-vinegar-mayo-mustard mixture, add salt and pepper and stir well. Turn off the heat, add in the remaining onions, bacon bits and spring onions and mix well.

Chill in the fridge (also great warm!!) and serve cold with boiled or grilled sausages.

Any German Speakers in the House?

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Ethnic, Oma, Recipes

My mother passed along some of my Oma’s recipes, and although I can translate them in bits and pieces, I’m having a bit of trouble with some of the words. I’d love to be able to make some of her dishes, so if anyone can help out, I’d be truly appreciative.

I’ve consolidated all of the handwritten recipes into a downloadable PDF file which is right here. Thank you, everyone, ahead of time, for whatever help you can provide.

Oma’s Red Cabbage

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Eating Local, Food Porn, Healthy, Oma, Produce, Recipes

Yesterday, I saw a red cabbage at the farmer’s market – and I thought back to the recipes that MY Oma used to make, and remembered that red cabbage kraut was one of her favorites. So even though this recipe is called “Oma’s Red Cabbage”, it’s not one of my Oma’s recipes, although it very well could be because it tastes nearly identical.

I can’t believe how quickly it came together. From raw cabbage to really tasty sweet-sour kraut in about an hour. Goes great with pork, to which my family can attest (we had it tonight with mashed ‘taters and mushroom-stuffed pork tenderloin with a port wine reduction). Lots of flavor, perfect if you’re trying to lose weight.

Oma's Red Cabbage

Oma’s Red Cabbage
recipe courtesy Recipezaar

1 red cabbage, shredded
1 medium onion, shredded
1 tablespoon Crisco
1 cup red wine
1/2 cup vinegar
5 tablespoons red currant jelly
salt and pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves (more if you like the taste)

Put all together in a large pot. Cover and simmer for 1 hour.

Apples & Thyme: Creamed Spinach

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Food Blogging Event, Food Porn, Oma, Recipes

apples-thyme-logo-br

My earliest food memory is from when I was about a year or two old, perched in my high chair, watching Mr. Rogers on two TVs at the same time, happily munching away on spinach. My Oma’s creamed spinach in particular. I practically grew up on this stuff, and it was my favorite food ever for many years. I’ve had tons of creamed spinach since then, some laden with so much fat I could feel my arteries clogging as I ate it, but none tasted quite as good as this old-fashioned granny recipe. In the grand scheme of things, it’s a lot healthier than it should be. The mouth feel is right, and you don’t miss the cheese or sour cream at all. But it’s definitely a recipe I’m proud to share with the Apples & Thyme blogging event, which celebrates time in the kitchen with our mothers and grandmothers.

Creamed Spinach

Creamed Spinach

10 oz. package of frozen chopped spinach
1 tbsp. butter
1-2 tbsp. flour
Maggi, to taste
Garlic Powder, to taste

Cook spinach according to package instructions, and then drain, reserving cooking water for later use. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a saucepan, and then add flour to make paste and allow to cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until roux is browned. Add cooking water and whisk, taking off heat when liquid is uniformed and thickened into a cream sauce. Season with Maggi and garlic powder to taste, and serve.

Markklosschen Suppe mit Fladle

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Ethnic, Food Porn, Oma, Recipes, Step by Step

If there’s one recipe that brings me right back to my childhood, standing on a stool in the kitchen looking over my Oma’s shoulder, this is it. This is a dish I remember fondly, and it was one of my favorites – so much so that my Oma would have to watch me like a hawk lest I pilfer away the dumplings by eating them raw. The concept of Markklosschen (Bone Marrow Dumplings) sounds strange to most in this day and age, but it takes the best part of the cow, where all of the flavor is at, and condenses it into meatball size. I had to try to find the recipe from memory, and had a bit of difficulty (trial and error, I’ll need to keep working on it) – the fleisch bruhe (meat consomme) and fladle (egg pancake noodles) came out exactly how I remembered, but the dumpling recipe I used ended up much tougher than I remembered. If you try to replicate the dish, use this recipe for the Markklosschen instead – it sounds much closer to my grandmothers recipe than the one I used. It’s a two day process – you make the consomme on the first day and allow it to chill overnight (this lets the fat rise and harden on the surface, so you can skim it off). You make the rest of the components on the day you’re making it. It is very time consuming, but well worth making. There’s enough consomme from this recipe that you can use half for the soup and freeze the other half.

Markklosschen and Fladle Soup

The first day is all about making the consomme – you want to get a pair of huge marrow bones (they look like this and are available at Bluescreek in the North Market for a reasonable price) and about 9 lbs. of cross-cut shanks/soup beef (I got mine through Flying J Farms at the Clintonville Farmer’s Market, with a few pounds of supplemental ones that I got on discount at Giant Eagle). Harvest all of the soft marrow from the marrow bones (if you meet resistance, leave it be) and set aside. Leave the marrow in the cross-cut shanks intact, and then proceed with the recipe from here.

Fleischbruhe (Meat Broth)
recipe source unknown – found here

9 lb Bones and meat scraps; from beef, pork and/or veal (I used all beef)
8 qt Water
2 md Onions; char-burned (not sure what that is – just used regular onions)
2 ea Parsely roots; quartered (I omitted this)
4 md Carrots; quartered
4 ea Celery stalks w/leaves; cut in chunks
2 ea Leeks; trimmed, cut in chunks
18 ea Peppercorns, black
4 ea Cloves, whole
1 ea Bay leaf
2 tb Salt

Preheat oven to 375F. Place bones and meat in large roasting pan – roast
until browned (took about an hour). Place water, roasted bones and meat in large stockpot.

Cover, bring to a boil – skim foam from surface until clear. Reduce heat – cook, uncovered, 1 hour. Add remaining ingredients, recover – simmer 3 hours.

Strain broth, discarding meat scraps, bones and cooked vegetables. Cool, pour into quart or pint containers with tight lids. Refrigerate, lift fat with fork and discard. Refrigerate 2 days or freeze 3 months. Bring broth to a full boil before using. (Important: Salt and pepper to taste!)

My grandmother used to not discard the leftover meat (she was a frugal woman), and instead (according to my mother) would serve it with boiled potatoes and creamed cabbage. Paul wasn’t too crazy for that idea so I ate what meat I could as a protein snack and gave the rest to the dogs for a treat.

Either way, after chilling overnight, the recipe produces a very flavorful consomme that gels beautifully. Just look at this wiggle:

Gelatinous Consomme

I prepared the markklosschen early in the afternoon (again, don’t use the recipe I used – use the one I linked to above) and then rolled them out into small balls in preparation for putting them into the soup. I put them in the fridge after they were rolled out.

Markklosschen

As I was heating up the consomme (I used about a gallon or so) on the stovetop, I started the batter for the fladle. After mixing it up, it should be a little thicker than crepe batter.

Fladle Batter

Fladle
recipe courtesy Recipe Cottage

200 g flour (1 3/4 cups)
2 eggs
1/4 l milk (1 cup plus 1 Tbsp)
1 pinch salt
Fat for frying

Mix the flour and milk, then add the eggs, and season with salt.
In a skillet, melt a little fat over medium heat. As soon as the
fat is hot, hold the skillet at a slight angle and pour in the
batter in such a manner that the whole bottom of the skillet is
covered with a thin layer. As soon as the bottom of the pancake
develops yellow spots, carefully loosen the edges with an egg
turner, then flip the pancake to cook the other side. Once the
‘Flaedle’ is done, set it aside for cooling.

If the ‘Flaedle’ is to be used in ‘Flaedle’-soup, roll it up and
cut it into very thin slices. Put into hot broth, and adjust
seasoning to taste, with nutmeg, chopped parsley or chives, etc.

(BTW, if you sweeten the batter with some sugar, and add some sliced apples, you have apfelpfankuchen (apple pancakes), another one of my favorites.)

By now, the consomme should be boiling – put in the markklosschen and turn down the heat to touch. Cook them until they float to the top and are tender inside. Think of them as compact matzoh balls and go for the same (but just a tad denser) consistency.

After frying the fladle in oil until gold-light brown, you want to cool them down and then roll them up and slice them thinly. You’ll end up with a big batch of “egg noodles”

Fladle

To finish the soup, toss the sliced fladle into the consomme with the markklosschen. Ladle into bowls and serve.

Not a perfect rendition of Oma’s dish, but damn close. I’ll keep working on it. When I was talking to my mother on the phone today, she told me she found some of Oma’s handwritten recipes (in German) that she’s going to scan in and send to me to see if I can decipher them. I can’t wait! Wish me luck…

Apples & Thyme: Sauerbraten

Author: swampkitty05  //  Category: Ethnic, Food Blogging Event, Food Porn, Oma, Recipes

Apples & Thyme Logo

The Apples & Thyme food blogging event asks us to celebrate the influence of our mothers and grandmothers in the kitchen. Needless to say, my German Oma (great-grandmother) has had the most influence on my cooking – I spent the formative years of my life standing on a stool next to her and learning everything she did in the kitchen hands on. I cannot remember a time in my life where I didn’t help her in the kitchen in one form or another – when I was a toddler, it may have been as simple as snapping off the ends of the green beans for her. Later on, it was making the dough for kuchen or mixing up the meat for frikadelle.

Oma and Opa

One of the dishes that has always remained mysterious to me, though, is sauerbraten. She didn’t make it too often – I think because it was a multi-day, somewhat time consuming recipe. So, unfortunately, I don’t have her recipe. But through trial and error, I’ve found one that comes close. I followed a suggested modification to make it in a crock pot, and it came out beautifully. It was delicious served on a bed of home made spaetzle.

Sauerbraten

Sauerbraten
recipe adapted from AllRecipes.com

2 c. cider vinegar
2 c. water
1/3 c. brown sugar
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/2 tsp. ground allspice
1 tbsp. salt
1/2 tsp. ground black pepper
6 black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 onions, diced
4 1/2 lbs. rump roast
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
3/4 c. crushed gingersnaps
1/4 c. brown sugar
1 c. sour cream

In large saucepan over medium heat, combine cider vinegar, water, brown sugar, cloves, allspice, salt, pepper, peppercorns, bay leaf, and onion. Heat, stirring occasionally, until bubbles appear at edges, but do not boil.

Poke deep holes in roast and place in non-metal bowl. Pour vinegar mixture over roast. Cover and refrigerate for four days, turning once daily.

On morning of fifth day put the meat and marinade into the crockpot, and cook it on low for 8 hours or until meat is fall-apart tender. Remove the meat from the pot, and whisk the brown sugar, crushed gingersnaps and sour cream into the liquid. Put the meat back in and serve, preferably with spaetzle.